Governor Holcomb issues a Stay-At-Home Order

On Monday March 23rd, Governor Eric J. Holcomb delivered a statewide address to order that Hoosiers remain in their homes except when they are at work or for permitted activities, such as taking care of others, obtaining necessary supplies, and for health and safety.

When does the order take effect?

The Stay-At-Home Order takes effect Tuesday, March 24 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

When does the order end?

The order ends on Monday, April 6, at 11:59 p.m. ET, but could be extended if the outbreak warrants it.

Where does the order apply?

The Stay-At-Home Order applies to the entire state of Indiana. Unless you work for an essential business or are doing an essential activity, you must stay home.

Is this mandatory or a recommendation?

This order is mandatory. For the safety of all Hoosiers, people must stay home and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

What is an essential business?

Essential businesses and services include but are not limited to grocery stores, pharmacies, gas stations, police stations, fire stations, hospitals, doctor’s offices, health care facilities, garbage pickup, public transit, and public service hotlines such as SNAP and HIP 2.0.  

A list can be found in the Governor’s executive order at in.gov/coronavirus.

What is an essential activity?

Essential activities include but are not limited to activities for health and safety, necessary supplies and services, outdoor activity, certain types of essential work, and to take care of others.

A list can be found in the Governor’s executive order at in.gov/coronavirus

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 - CDC INFORMATION 

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
COVID-19 HOTLINE
317-233-7125 or 317-233-1325 After Hours

ANY QUESTIONS & CONCERNS REGARDING COVID-19

https://www.in.gov/isdh/28470.htm

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Dangers of Lead

Lead can prevent a child from developing to his or her potential. Research has demonstrated that childhood exposure to lead at unsafe levels can cause learning disabilities, decreased growth, hyperactivity, and brain damage. In pregnant women, lead exposure can pass through the body to the unborn child and result in birth defects or miscarriage.

Lead may be found in dust, paint, glazed pottery or crystal from other countries, drinking water pipes and soil.

About Lead Poisoning

Symptoms of Lead PoisoningLead poisoning is the condition of increased levels of lead in the blood.  Lead is a natural occurring element that is used commonly in commercial & industrial products.  People have small levels of lead in their bloodstream and it may cause no problems, but increased or prolonged exposure can result in lead poisoning. Lead poisoning is especially a concern for children under six years of age.

  • Lead poisoning can cause damage to the kidneys, nervous system, and brain.
  • Lead poisoning may also cause hearing, behavior and learning problems in young children.
  • Once organ systems are damaged, the damage is often irreversible.
  • Often lead poisoning goes undetected because the initial signs are similar to common ailments.

Steps to prevent Lead contamination in your home

  • Taking shoes off when entering the home can keep lead dust levels to a minimum
  • When opening windows, clean out dust and paint chips with an all-purpose cleaner
  • Wash children’s hands and toys often, to keep them from ingesting lead dust
  • Old porcelain bathtubs and sinks are often coated with a lead glaze, have them re-glazed
  • Antique cribs and other furniture were often painted with lead paint
  • Baseboards and wood floors were painted with lead paint for durability
  • Pottery, ceramics, and crystal often contain high amounts of lead
  • Eating foods high in iron and calcium can decrease the amount of lead absorbed into the blood stream
  • Replace all older vinyl mini-blinds, as they may contain high amounts of lead
  • Avoid using the folk medicines, Greta and Azarcon to treat childhood illnesses
  • Before refinishing furniture or stripping paint, be aware of the possible dangers and use proper safety measures and techniques
  • Make sure crayons are either made in America or meet the American Society for Testing and Materials standards

Graphic Attribution: By Mikael Häggström - Own work, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40804069

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   Please Note: Our Lead Screening survey is designated for Physician Offices. 

 

Promoting a Safe and Healthy Community for the People of Clark County Indiana